Four new members made a yearlong commitment to join the Dominican Young Adults at an evening prayer service at the Motherhouse on November 20, 2016.  Katherine Maloney, Emily Brierly, Diana Pretter and Victoria Castellano, attend meetings at Molloy College in Rockville Centre. There are more than 20 members in the group.

Dominican Young Adults (DYAs) are women and men ages 18-30 who meet monthly for prayer, study and community in the Catholic tradition. They also do service projects locally and internationally, while following in the footsteps of St. Dominic.

“Dominic began the Order after a night of debate with a bartender at an inn. I don’t think it can get much more ‘real’ than that!” said new DYA Katherine Maloney. “[The Order] was born in an unlikely place, showing that God is with us no matter where we are.”

In addition to being a DYA, Katherine is also a member of the Dominican Volunteers, USA. Dominican Volunteers make a yearlong commitment to service in social justice ministries for a small stipend and board. Katherine was placed full-time at the United Nations, working in committee on important issues like women and girls, human trafficking, migration and food security. She lives in an intergenerational community in the Bronx with another Dominican Congregation, the Dominican Sisters of Blauvelt. Living with Religious Sisters, she does what they do.  At 5:30 am, they gather for Morning Prayer. Then, they go to work. When they get home, they eat family-style, taking turns cooking.

“Most nights we watch the news and talk about current events right after dinner,” said Katherine.  “It’s really interesting to learn about their lives and to hear their insights!”

Following the commitment service, Sister Gina Fleming, OP, Youth Promoter for the Order, noted, “I looked around the chapel at the Sisters and Associates as well as the parents. I could see how moved they were by these young people. They have claimed their place in the Dominican Family and they are very proud of it.”

“While many Dominican Young Adults or Dominican Volunteers may not make the commitment to vowed Religious Life, we can still carry on the four pillars of Dominican Charism – service, community, prayer and study – and make them a central part of our lives, and subsequently part of our familys’ and friends’ lives,” said Katherine.